Tag Archives: Resurrection

A Word in Time: Wednesday

Luke 9:18-27

Peter’s Declaration about Jesus

 Once when Jesus was praying alone, with only the disciples near him, he asked them, ‘Who do the crowds say that I am?’ They answered, ‘John the Baptist; but others, Elijah; and still others, that one of the ancient prophets has arisen.’ He said to them, ‘But who do you say that I am?’ Peter answered, ‘The Messiah of God.’

Jesus Foretells His Death and Resurrection

 He sternly ordered and commanded them not to tell anyone, saying, ‘The Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.’

Then he said to them all, ‘If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it. What does it profit them if they gain the whole world, but lose or forfeit themselves? Those who are ashamed of me and of my words, of them the Son of Man will be ashamed when he comes in his glory and the glory of the Father and of the holy angels. But truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the kingdom of God.’

Psalm: Psalm 74:1-12

Background

What is the mark of a true follower of Christ? Is it someone who can properly identify him or the person who gets on with the business of walking out a daily pilgrimage of faith?

In a quiet moment, Luke’s Gospel appears to have Jesus ask in an almost disinterested way if the disciples have been listening to the gossip about him: “Who do the crowds say that I am?” (v. 18). Could he be John the Baptist come back to life, or the great hero Elijah? Was it possible, the crowds were wondering, that another prophet was back among them?

Peter piped up that he has the answer: they are praying alongside ‘the Messiah of God’ (v. 20).

You might expect Jesus to have congratulated them for getting it right, but instead he begins to talk about suffering, rejection and his ultimate Passion. It’s as if the revelation of who he is unlocks the ability for the disciples to now appreciate what is coming their way.

More than that, they have to be confronted by the reality of discipleship. Jesus says: “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it” (vv. 23-24).

Discipleship isn’t simply about knowing that Jesus is Lord and taking up the cross isn’t about putting up with some difficult, or even very tough, things in your life. Too often we trot out the phrase “It’s a cross I have to bear” when we talk about an inconvenience.

Jesus was calling the disciples, and us, to be prepared to die daily to their own desires in order to put God and the kingdom first: even at the cost of their own lives – just as he would give up his life for the whole world.

To Ponder

  • How does the Church in the West take up its cross daily?
  • Have we cheapened the idea of taking up our cross? If so, how? And what might we do to re-address this?
  • How do we renew the idea of daily discipleship?
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Life walks from a borrowed cave

 

empty_tomb_edited_small.jpg
Tomb Empty With Shroud And Crucifixion At Sunrise

Yet silently, as morning breaks,

the risen Lord is found.

A battle fought beyond the grave

has ended with a shout: ‘He saves!’

and Life walks from a borrowed cave,

now holy ground.

Daily thought: borrowing days

This is the final Daily Thought for BBC Radio Solent during Holy Week.

Resurrection Of Jesus


There is an old Scottish and Shetland proverb that the last three days of March are “borrowing days”. These are supposed to be unusually stormy, and March “borrows” them from April in a last-ditch attempt to influence the spring weather, before March winds give way to April showers.

The same story crops up in a Spanish folk-tale: a shepherd promises to give March a lamb if he will reduce the strength of his winds, protecting the flocks. But once March has done so, the shepherd refuses to pay up. In revenge, March borrows three days from April, and produces even fiercer winds to pay back the shepherd for his deceit.

Borrowing and lending always has its consequences, I guess.

Today is Good Friday and I want to mention someone closely involved after the crucifixion of Jesus, an event the Christian Church marks today.

Joseph of Arimathea is described in the Bible as a rich man, a disciple of Jesus and a respected member of the Jewish council. We also know he didn’t support the council’s decision to call for Jesus’s death.

He watched as Jesus was crucified and then Joseph took Jesus’s body and, according to Matthew’s gospel, laid it to rest in a tomb in his own garden.

On Sunday, Christians will celebrate the belief that God raised Jesus from the dead, so Joseph’s act of extraordinary generosity was only needed for a handful of days.

But that doesn’t diminish his gift. After all, who expects a borrowed grave to be returned with grateful thanks – by the occupant?

 

That the world may belong …

It’s Resurrection Day, the morning we celebrate the fact that the tomb was empty. Despite all the attempts of the authorities to silence Jesus and his message of overwhelming love and hope, he had broken death’s stronghold.

On Easter morning hope was reborn. As first light dawned it became clear that darkness would not have the final word and the cross – that foul instrument of torture – became a symbol of rebirth.

Here is a hymn that reminds us of all the ways the cross still stands to call the Church to action in the world for the good of others.

It is sung to the tune for Great is thy Faithfulness.

God of our sunrise and light of the morning,
dawn on our worship, renew us today.
Come by your Spirit and fill with your passion,
set us on fire with the Gospel we pray.
 
Chorus
We are your people, the Church you have chosen.
We are a gift to the weak and the strong.
We are the shape of your love for all people.
Help us to live that the world may belong.
 
Jesus your cross is the hope of the hopeless,
guide of the blind and the staff of the lame.
Here, as the nations are grieving and limping,
Give us compassion to live for your name.
 
Jesus your cross is the world’s consolation,
object of pain yet the strength of the weak.
Here, as we struggle for peace and for meaning
Jesus we ask for your courage to speak.
 
Jesus your cross is the birthplace of justice,
cloth for the naked, refreshment for thirst.
Here, as we seek ways to live out the Gospel,
May we repent of our need to be first.
 
Jesus your cross is the mystery that beckons:
drawing us close till we see face to face,
sharing your love with the world in its turmoil,
blessing with your uncontrollable grace.
Copyright © Gareth Hill Publishing/Song Solutions CopyCare, 14 Horsted Square, Uckfield, TN22 1QG www.songsolutions.org

Death … interrupted

My Easter sermon for 2016.

Stop     … they found the stone rolled away, but they did not find the body

 Luke 24: 1-2

On the first day of the week, very early in the morning, the women took the spices they had prepared and went to the tomb. They found the stone rolled away from the tomb.

The women expected things to be as it always was when someone died.

It wasn’t so much that life was carrying on as normal – death was carrying on as normal.

They had seen Jesus die. They had seen the body taken down and put in the tomb. The Sabbath then intervened but on Sunday morning they came back. What else could they do but anoint it for burial?

From then everything would go on in the same, slow, cold, dead way …

Except … they have to stop because death has been interrupted.

The two men in dazzling clothes had to begin the process of helping them to rewind through all that Jesus had taught them. How important it is to go back into Jesus’ story and recount it for ourselves: not to spend time in the place of death looking for the living words of Jesus.

 

Stand   … he is not here, but has risen. Remember!

Luke 24: 4b-6

two men in clothes that gleamed like lightning stood beside them. In their fright the women bowed down with their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, ‘Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here; he has risen! Remember…

Life was pretty tough in first century Palestine so to be dazzled at a tomb wasn’t your everyday experience. These two men, certainly we are meant to understand them as angels from God, had terrified the women.

Don’t forget they had come in the dark to embalm a body and now it’s missing … or as they are beginning to remember, alive.

They stand there and the story begins to percolate in their hearts and bodies. Three lovely words from Luke: “then they remembered”. Imagine how that scene unfolded as they reminded each other of their shared experiences with Jesus.

They stood there holding unwanted spices for a dead man; perfumes to anoint a corpse. What do we do with these now? Throw them away?!?

They remembered! Jesus had told them it would be like this and, despite living alongside him for three years, it had not sunk into their hearts.

How often do we need to break out of what can become a sense of functional atheism? I’m in the church, I know about Jesus but will I let his death and resurrection become part of who I am.

 

Step out          … he commanded us to preach and to testify

Acts 10: 39-40, 42

39 ‘We are witnesses of everything he did in the country of the Jews and in Jerusalem. They killed him by hanging him on a cross, 40 but God raised him from the dead on the third day and caused him to be seen… 42 He commanded us to preach to the people and to testify…

The women left the tomb told the eleven and, initially, no one believed them until Peter went to investigate. Our second reading is part of the story of Peter preaching to the Roman soldier Cornelius and his household – being a witness to the resurrection.

Peter had crossed a great gulf between the Jewish Christian church and the Gentiles. Why? Well he says he can’t do any other.

We are witnesses to all that he did…

[God] commanded us to preach to the people and to testify …

Peter is remembering his story. He stepped in to the tomb and saw that Jesus was no longer in it. Then he stepped out looking with new eyes.

Luke says he went home amazed at what had happened. We know from the Bible that very soon he met Jesus face to face.

IMG_0208.JPG Perhaps you need to meet Jesus this morning in a new way.

To stop at the tomb and know that Good Friday is not the end of the story …

… or to stand and hear the words ‘he is risen’ and know they are true for your life too …

… or to find the right way to step out and be a witness in the place where God has put you.